Author: new_eiknb8

Hamble

More information   Village information and news www.hamble.net Details of the fun-filled Hamble Week Event www.hambleweek.co.uk   Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages   Visitors to Hamble village can take in the superb views of the river and its marinas from the Quay, and enjoy traditional shopping in its the bottom of the cobbled High Street. Commemorative plaques record Hamble’s contribution to the D-Day landings during the Second World War which saw the river as busy as it had been in 1346, at the height of the Hundred
 Years War. There is a wealth of history around every corner, like street name ‘Rope Walk’ which belies its history of hemp-based marine rope-making. By necessity ropes of 120 fathoms (720 feet) were made here, long and narrow enough to reach Hamble Manor House which was once owned by infamous East End gangsters, the Krays. There are numerous pubs and restaurants in the village and in each of the three marinas. Hamble Point Marina in particular offer splendid views across the river to sit and watch, for instance, the magnificent cruise liners visiting Southampton. Hamble Common provides a great opportunity to enjoy local wildlife. Visitors can walk through this SSSI and enjoy its 55 acres of heathland, woodland and saltmashes and see remains of Iron Age settlements and a Napoleonic gun battery. Hamble hosts a number of events throughout the year including the family-fun Hamble...

Read More

Netley Abbey – A Gothic Tale

For over two thousand years the curious have visited the picturesque 13th century ruins in the vilage of Netley Abbey on  Southampton Water. The buildings that now comprise Netley Abbey ruins were first know to the monks of the Cistercian Order who lived in the Abbey for over three hundred years, commissioners of King Henry VIII, the first Marquis of Winchester. Legends of Netley Abbey As expected, Netley Abbey has its legends, ghosts and of course a curse which is said to date from the time of the dissolution of the monsteries. One of the Abbey Monks, ‘Blind Peter’ became the guardian of the Abbey’s treasure against Henry VIII. In an attempt to find the treasure, a gentleman named Mr Slown arrived at the Abbey and began to dig a hole. Moments later he ran away screaming and collapsed within minutes from a heart attack uttering his dying words ‘For God’s sake, block it up.’ Another victim of the curse was local builder Walter Taylor. In 1700, when Taylor was intent of removing  stones from the site to to use in a town house, he had a terrible nightmare. In the dream, he was visited by a monk who warned him of great mischief if he was to continue with this plans. However, contrary to his advice, Taylor took part in the demolition and in the course of tearing...

Read More

Reach for the Sky – The Aviation History

More information  To request a copy of Reach for the Sky or 100 Years of Flying in South Hampshire, contactinfo@hamblevalley.com 023 80001655 For events and information on the Centenary of Flight visit www.centenary-of-flight.co.uk The Hamble Valley region was a centre for early aviation, particularly around two early airfields; one which was developed in Hamble and the second in Eastleigh which eventually became Southampton Internation Airport.  Back in 1910, at a time when aircraft were in their infancy, local man, Edwin Rowland Moon, triumphantly flew his homemade Moonbeam II aircraft from the fields of North Stoneham Farm (which is now Southampton Airport) Situated on the outskirts of Eastleigh town, it is also the site where the Spitfire took its maiden flight in 1936. Its designer RJ Mitchell, is buried at South Stoneham cemetery adjacent to the airport and a near life size sculpture of the prototype Spitfire marks the entrance of the airport today. Many famous aviators also worked at Hamble’s three airfields, where between 1913 and 1984 there were six aircraft manufactuters. The first aviation activity happened in 1911 when Hamble Boat builders Luke Brothers built a floatplane. The fascinting history of aviation in the Hamble Valley is explained in the free leaflet ‘Reach for the Skies’ and includes local stories from the many local people who worked on the Spitfires or flew them. Throughout 2010, Southampton International Airport celebrates...

Read More

Maritime Memories

Maritime Mem More information To request a copy of Maritime Memories contact info@hamblevalley.com 023 80001655   There have been people living and working on the banks of the River Hamble for over two thousand years. Archaeology has shown that the Salterns, on the river edge near Bursledon, were in use from c100BC – 100AD The River Hamble rises near Waltham Chase and flows past Botley, then Bursledon, past Hamble and runs into The Solent. Its double tides provide a high tide which lasts well over 2 hours and after this there is a quick short ebb tide which is followed by a long flood tide. These double tides and the safe harbour the river provides has meant that the River Hamble has been linked to the country’s maritime heritage since men first went to sea in ships.   The ships Henry V’s flagship the Grace Dieu was brought to the Hamble at Bursledon during the 100 Years War with France, but caught fire after being hit by lightning. Her wreck (one of many in the River Hamble) can be seen at low tide from Manor Farm Country Park. The Elephant, Nelson’s flagship in the Battle of Copenhagen was built on the River Hamble. It was during this battle that Nelson ignored the command to withdraw putting his telescope to his blind eye and remarking to the ship’s captain “You...

Read More

Hamble Valley Heritage Guides

Discover more about the picturesque Hamble Valley on a guided walk or coach tour   Enjoy a variety of walks whilst learning some fascinating facts about the heritage of the area including the 13th century ruins of Netley Abbey and its links with King Henry VIII, Jane Austen, Artist JMW Turner and tales of ghastly hauntings.   Discover villages like the pretty maritime village of Hamble Le Rice, and learn of its connections with smuggling, rope making, the author Neville Shute, Edward Heath and oysters; Bursledon’s shipbuilders – good enough for Nelson; West End with its Titanic connections; Eastleigh’s railway history; Botley’s Assize and William Cobbett are amongst the villages and topics covered in the guided walks programme.   The long distance Strawberry Trail is also available for those who prefer the more energetic walks. A Winter walk programme is also available, making use of the Borough’s outstanding network of footpaths.   Guided tours for groups Private Group tours – including a wide variety of talks covering local history, travel and natural history. These include such titles as; The Hamble Valley; Headaches, Haemorrhoids and Herbals – plants and medicine from the past; An Armchair tour of Netley Abbey Village; Victorian Cemeteries and Marquis, Monks and Mysteries – the story of Netley Abbey. Tailormade themed walks including aviation histories of Eastleigh and Hamble, Architectural talks and walks, and the Cobbett Trail. Coach excursions for...

Read More