Author: new_eiknb8

Bishop’s Waltham

More information   For a week in July
 the grounds of the Palace come alive again for the town’s Summer Festival. www.bishopswalthamfestival.com   Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages Set in glorious Hampshire countryside, Bishop’s Waltham is attractive, historic and has much to offer the visitor. The town lies in the north of the Hamble Valley, and it is here that the river itself rises from various sources. A palace was founded here in 1136 by Bishop Henri de Blois, grandson of William the Conqueror, and for centuries, Bishop’s Waltham Palace was an important residence of the powerful Winchester bishops. Here Henry V prepared for the Battle of Agincourt and Queen Mary I waited for King Philip to arrive from Spain for their wedding. Under Cromwell’s orders, the palace was destroyed in 1644, but the extensive remains can still be explored. It is now managed by English Heritage and is open all year. With town and country walks, including a section of the medieval Pilgrims’ Trail, good pub food and excellent restaurants, Bishop’s Waltham is perfect for a day out, or as a touring base for a longer stay. Bishop’s Waltham is located on
the scenic country route between Winchester and Portsmouth and is
close to Marwell Wildlife. The perfect antidote to out of town shopping, Bishop’s Waltham boasts traditional and specialist shops. Here you will find craft shops and galleries,...

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Netley

Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages Netley lies in the parish of Hound, the name of which derives from a plant called ‘Hoarhound’ which grew profusely in the area. An attractive small village, Netley edges Southampton Water and neighbours one of Hamble Valley’s most popular attractions, Royal Victoria Country Park. Covering 200 acres, the park is divided into woodland, parkland and foreshore with views across the water. Discover the history of the site in the Heritage Centre and make your way to the top of the chapel tower with one of the expert Tower Guides. The Royal Victoria Railway is situated within the park and is a steam railway offering rides for children throughout the school holidays. The imposing ruins of the 13th century, Netley Abbey lies at the other end of the village and makes a perfect picnic spot. Netley’s foreshore was once entirely wooded and was described by William Cobbett as ‘one of the prettiest scenes in the whole country’ Netley Abbey … The buildings that now comprise Netley Abbey ruins were first known to the monks of the Cistercian order who lived in the Abbey for over three hundred years, commissioners of King Henry VIII, the first Marquis of Winchester. For over two thousand years the curious have visited Netley Abbey and today the ruins are in the care of English Heritage for everyone to enjoy. It’s also full...

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Wickham

Events later this year in Wickham …   Wickham Festival, 2nd – 5th August 2012 A family-friendly Music & Arts Festival in a stunningly beautiful rural setting on the outskirts of Wickham village. Lots of entertainment for all ages. Box Office 023 8071 1818www.wickhamfestival.co.uk   Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages   The unusual medieval square, Georgian houses, intriguing shops and good eateries are surrounded by the attractive countryside of the Meon Valley. Here you can stroll through the water meadows to visit the nearby Bere Forest and the Old Meon Railway. Wickham dates back to at least Roman times and has a rich history. It was home to the great Bishop William of Wykeham,
the founder of Winchester College and New College, Oxford. Wickham square has intriguing shops and attractive Georgian houses. The nearby meadows offer endless walking opportunities with picnic and barbecue facilities. Wickham Vineyard at
Shedfield is close by with vineyard tours and tastings, and has an excellent restaurant. There has been a mill on the site of a Roman ford across the River Meon in Wickham since the 16th century. The historical significance of this fine building arises from the source of the timbers used in its construction. These came from the US frigate Chesapeake, captured by the Royal Navy during the war of 1812. The mill ceased commercial operation in 1976 and today the building offers...

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Bursledon

More information about Bursledon …   General village information 
www.bursledon.org   Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages Bursledon … a rich and varied history Steeped in heritage, Bursledon was for centuries the centre in Southern England for shipbuilding. Henry V’s flagship The Grace Dieu was brough to the River Hamble at Bursledon for safe keeping during the Hundred Years War with France, but caught fire after being hit by lightning. Her wreck (one of many in the River Hamble) can be seen at low tide from the jetty in Manor Farm Country Park. The Centre of this historic village is a Conservation Area packed with quaint cottages and fascinating traditional grand houses. The Hamble Valley’s heritage comes to life in Bursledon with two attractions providing interesting and fun family days out. See how Burlsedon Windmill, Hampshire’s only working windmill, makes stone-ground flour and learn about the machinery. At Bursledon Brickworks Industrial Museum explore the brickworkings and museum and see demonstrations. The Jolly Sailor Pub is one of the most spectacular pub-restaurants and located right on the water, overlooking the Hamble Estuary. With its own jetty it is here that the views and fun of the annual Swanwick, Bursledon and Warsash Regatta can be enjoyed. Taking place at the end of August and with a different theme each year, the regatta is a great family event....

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Botley

More information   Local information, news and events visitwww.botley.com   Back to Hamble Valley Towns & Villages There is plenty to keep the family busy in this popular village with its charming local shops and self-guided walks, including the celebrated Cobbett Trail which follows in the footsteps of Botley’s most famous resident. This and other points of local interest are described in the new Botley visitor leaflet and information boards located at car parks and Botley Mills. Manor Farm Country Park is easily accessible from Botley along the peaceful country lanes. Children will enjoy a visit to the Victorian working farm or discovering the 400 acres of countryside which reaches down to the banks of the river. Botley is also the start of the popular long distance walk, The Strawberry Trail. During
 summer months The Village Horse Bus offers carriage rides around The village and Manor Farm Country Park. More information can be found in the Botley leaflet, call 01489 787181 to request a copy or call into the new information centre at All Saints Church 
on the High Street. Many of the buildings in the old market square are much older than their frontages suggest. The distinctive Market Hall, which features in Botley’s logo, has been home to a market from the 18th century until recently. Imagine the square filled with up to 14 public houses and ale houses open...

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